To Infiniti…and Beyond!

What do you get when you take one 45-year-old man and add in a heart attack? A serious mid-life crisis! Surviving a heart attack last month really fucked with my concept of the future and now I truly understand what people mean when they say life is short. Shit, life can end in the blink of an eye. So why put off until tomorrow what you can do today?

For me, that means getting the car of my dreams. I have always wanted a convertible but old “practical” Len kept buying the Honda Accords and the Nissan Altimas. Hey, there’s nothing wrong with being practical and those cars served me well. But this life-altering event called for something really, really impractical! Why not, right? We have the Murano for long trips and hauling stuff around town, so today I got the flippin’ convertible!

Len Gutman would like to introduce the newest member of the family — the fully loaded 2011 Infiniti G37 convertible:

This is a car show image, but this is the car I leased today…black obsidian with wheat leather interior. Rear-wheel drive. V6. 330 horses. Retractable hard-top roof. Wicked sound system with Bose speakers built into the headrests. Navigation with real-time traffic. Heated and cooling seats.

I’m kinda diggin’ this whole Len 2.0 thing. You know you’re jealous! 😉

Are You a Heart Attack Waiting to Happen?

calciumThe most common question I’ve received so far from friends and relatives regarding my heart attack is how in the world did this happen to me? It’s true, on the surface I seem like the least likely person to have a heart attack. But the truth is, I was a ticking time bomb and had no idea. This much is true — I am thin, I run three miles three times per week, I do not eat meat with the exception of some fish, I have a relatively stress-free job and I see my doctor regularly. So why did I have a heart attack at 45?

I’m not sure we’ll ever fully know the answer to that question, but here are some other facts:

  • I have had high cholesterol and triglycerides  for more than a decade. I have been monitoring this, however, and have been on a baby aspirin and a statin (Lipitor) for many years and every six months I get my blood tested and my cholesterol numbers have been good. Last check my overall cholesterol was around 175.
  • I have a terrible family history of heart disease. My grandmother and grandfather on my dad’s side both died relatively young from heart related illness. My father had a heart attack in his early 60s, had both carotid arteries blocked and had quadruple bypass surgery. He has high blood pressure and diabetes.
  • I grew up in a household where both parents smoked and I ate a shitload of red meat and fatty foods well into my late 20s. I had a 80-90 percent blockage in one artery and it probably started long before I began to take care of myself.
  • What I’ve learned in the past few weeks is that with my family history I should have done more to keep my cholesterol down even lower.

So what could I have done differently? What can you do if you have concerns about your own heart health? The first step is to see your primary care physician and get a blood workup. After that, make an appointment to see a cardiologist to get a baseline of your heart health. They’ll do an EKG and maybe even a stress test. I saw a cardiologist about 8 years ago right after my dad had his bypass. I was 38 and the doctor told me to take a baby aspirin every day, stay active, eat right and come back and see him in five years. I did not, and looking back he may have done a stress test at that time and found the blockage before I had my heart attack.

But there’s a new test that is available now that anyone can take and it can determine your likelihood to have a heart attack well in advance and it is non-invasive. It’s called a Calcium Score Test and it’s a simple CT scan that can show whether or not you have any blockages. Had I had one of these tests they would have seen my blockage and been able to go in and clear it out before I had a heart attack and before any long-term damage was done to my heart. Wow.

The test is available at many places around the Valley. Because it’s new, it is not covered by most insurance companies (why does that not surprise me? ) but it’s really inexpensive. You can get the test for under $100 at Abrazo and Chandler Regional for example:

Get smart for your heart!

Len 2.0

I realize this is a cliché, but I have been thinking a lot about life these past few weeks and I sort of get the whole re-birth thing. I really do feel like I have a second chance at life and that has caused me to think about all of the things I always said I wanted to do but never got around to. I have also been thinking about past mistakes and regrets, and although I have made it a point not to dwell on the past, there are some things I’d like to go back and fix.

Yesterday, for example, I reconnected with an old friend that I lost touch with. I was thinking about all the great times we had in college and afterward and I realized I had no idea why we lost touch. All I knew is that I wanted to talk to him and find out what he’s been up to — and after a 20 minute phone call I felt great about rebuilding that relationship, hearing about his new family, and generally just knowing he was doing well. I’m not going to get all preachy during my recovery but if there’s someone important out there that you have lost touch with take the first step and give him or her a call.

My friend and co-worker Mike McClary and I both returned to the corporate world together last year after many years in solo practices and we agreed the second time around in the corporate world would be different because we were wiser, older and less concerned about all the usual corporate B.S. that made us hate corporate America in the past. We call this new attitude “Corporate 2.0” and for the most part we’ve managed to make it work. This has inspired me to call my post-heart attack life “Len 2.0”

Len 2.0 is more than just a philosophy though because I really did almost kick the bucket a few weeks ago! I remember after my mother-in-law passed away at an early age Leslie and I talked a lot about how she had done all the things expected of a wife and mother and when she was finally free from those responsibilities she always thought she’d be able to finally do all the things in life she wanted to do. She was young, had some money and had the desire…but it turns out she didn’t have the health and unfortunately she ran out of time. We always said we weren’t going to make the same mistake — we were going to do all the things we wanted to do while we had the chance. But it’s not so easy. Sure, we went to Hawaii a few times and I went back to school to get a master’s degree. But the truth is there are tons of things we want to do but haven’t gotten around to. That changes now.

I have actually created a bucket list. I don’t care how silly it seems — life is just too damn short. I’ve added a page to this blog to host the list and it’ll be a living list that gets updated as I think of more things I want to do. There’s not much there yet, but I assure you it will grow. Feel free to offer suggestions, but I can tell you now I’m not going to jump out of an airplane no matter what!