Heart Attack Survivors Should Embrace Prescription Drug Therapy

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It’s amazing to me how many people I’ve met in my life who complain about prescription drugs. They treat headaches with meditation, muscle pain with acupuncture and guzzle herbal tea for everything from indigestion to toe fungus. In America, measles is making a comeback because uninformed parents refuse to inoculate their kids because some quack on the Internet referenced a flawed study in a phoney medical journal. Yes, some “alternative” treatments have therapeutic value. But you’ve had a heart attack — it’s time to put your big boy pants on and take your meds. Former heavyweight boxing champion Mike Tyson famously said “everyone has a plan until they get hit.” That’s how I feel about people who refuse to take the life-saving drugs available today. Think about how lucky we are to live in a time when researchers have developed extraordinary medicines to keep us alive. There’s a reason why your grandfather died after a heart attack when he was 45 — all he had to treat his diseased heart was aspirin and Alka-Seltzer.

If you are one of those lucky people that has gotten through life having barely having to take even a simple Tylenol for a headache, congratulations. But if you’ve had a heart attack, that part of your life is over. The sooner you get over the fact that you have to buy one of those pill cases with the days of the week on them to keep track of all your medications the better. Seriously, what’s the big deal? Take your medicine.

Current treatment methodologies for heart attack patients have drastically reduced the risk of death from 30% in the 1960s to approximately 3–4% today. Part of this is due to medical advancements like angioplasty and stents, and part of it is due to the discovery of new medications. Historically speaking, it wasn’t that long ago that first-line treatment for heart disease included bloodletting or mercury.

In truth, it’s a glorious time to be alive. Medical advancements in the 20th century have had a significant impact on the health of humans and one need only look at life expectancy to see just how significant we’re talking about. At the start of the 20th century, according to the World Health Organization the average global life expectancy was 31. 100 years later, it is 65.6 and in some countries it is as high as 80. The reason for this dramatic improvement is multifold, but some of the key reasons include the eradication of infectious diseases like smallpox, polio and leprosy and the decline in deaths from diseases like measles. In fact, in just the past century science introduced vaccines against the six most deadly childhood killers (polio, diphtheria, measles, mumps, rubella, and chickenpox). Advances in childbirth safety made a huge impact too. Other important advancements included the use of randomized clinical trials, vitamin supplements, insulin treatment for diabetics, chemotherapy, x-rays, and of course the introduction of antibiotics. In the heart diseases realm, the past 100 years have seen the introduction of bypass surgery, heart transplants, and pacemakers to name a few. And in terms of noninvasive treatment, we’ve seen the development of numerous drugs to treat all aspects of heart disease.

All this is to say, depending on your specific condition, today’s medical professionals have a huge arsenal from which to choose to treat your heart disease. And yes, with many medications there are side effects, but the side effects are far outweighed by the success of these drug treatments. To be sure, some of us will experience a side effect that is too severe to live with, but even then there are both mainstream and alternative treatments.

I am now nearly six years post heart attack, and my heart is doing great; in fact, I suspect it’s in better shape today than it was before my heart attack. I attribute this to following a good diet, exercising, and taking my meds. Yeah, I had to buy two pill boxes to keep track of everything I’m taking (one for the morning and one for the evening) but what’s the alternative? I’ll tell you what the alternative is — dying.

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