Heart Disease, Depression Strongly Linked

anthony-bourdain-dead-6The suicides this week of Kate Spade and Anthony Bourdain have left many of us wondering how in the world such successful people can feel so helpless as to end their own lives. For sure, depression is a dark passenger that is tough to shake.

Depression is also decidedly linked to heart disease. Heart disease can cause depression, and in fact, does in a large percentage of those who suffer a heart attack or similar major cardiac event. Up to 15 percent of patients with cardiovascular disease and up to 20 percent of patients who have undergone coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery experience major depression (American Heart Journal).

On the flip side, depression can actually cause heart disease. Studies have shown that depression and stress has a negative effect on the heart and can lead to high blood pressure, irregular heartbeat, and even increased inflammatory markers like C-reactive protein which is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease.

I bring this up to remind us all that depression is a serious matter that can destroy a life in many different ways, not just through suicide. So much of what we read about how to prevent heart disease focuses on diet, exercise and risk factors like smoking. But not much is written about the cardiovascular effects of poor mental health.

That said, a focus on total health that includes mental health is the first line of defense against heart disease. Any medical professional worth their weight in education should prescribe mental health therapy as part of any approach to overall wellness. Mind and body are inexorably linked.

The good news is that many of the things prescribed for overall health work to balance mental health and stress as well. Eating well, sleeping well and regular exercise positively affects the body and the mind. Activities like yoga, meditation and mindfulness also have powerful ramifications for both physical and mental wellbeing.

I have to admit I’m not a big fan of exercise and while I’ve tried yoga and meditation I can’t seem to get inspired to make either of them part of my daily routine. I know I should, but since I don’t enjoy it I always find excuses. But every time, without fail, I feel better mentally after exercise.

I’ll try to find more inspiration to exercise, not only for my physical health but for my mental wellbeing. As a heart attack survivor, it’s even more important for me to exercise. The American Heart Association recommends at least 150 minutes per week of moderate exercise or 75 minutes per week of vigorous exercise (or a combination of moderate and vigorous activity). That doesn’t seem so hard.

Just a few days ago a new study was published that suggested just 30 minutes of exercise four to five times per week is enough to keep your heart young.

“Exercising four to five times a week appears to be a sweet spot for overall artery health.” — Study author Dr. Benjamin Levine, a professor of internal medicine at UT Southwestern Medical Center

As for depression, don’t let it get the best of you. It’s bad for your heart and it can easily spiral out of control. If you’re experiencing depression, seek help immediately. There’s no stigma associated with getting help for mental health. And there are so many ways to treat depression, from the aforementioned exercise to therapy to medication.

If you have any suicidal thoughts, reach out right away to the The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, a national network of local crisis centers that provides free and confidential emotional support to people in suicidal crisis or emotional distress 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. The number to call is:

1-800-273-8255

Given how Anthony Bourdain lived — eating everything and anything, drinking, smoking, and taking drugs, it’s amazing he didn’t die from a heart attack. In fact, when I first saw the headline this morning that’s exactly what I thought happened. But no, it was depression. It’s ironic and sad that a guy who lived life on the edge was taken by his mind not his body. Perhaps there’s a lesson there for us all.

 

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