So You Think Keto is Extreme? Hold My Beer!

Two weeks ago I went to my first appointment with a new primary care physician and she said that while my bloodwork looked pretty darn good, she thought my sugars were still a little higher than she’d like to see. For crying out loud, I’ve been eating like a champ and my other numbers are, frankly, enviable. Total cholesterol 108. LDLs 59. HDLs 41. Triglycerides 94.

But my glucose was at 106, a touch higher than the recommended 99. And then there’s my LP-IR Score of 56. Any doctors out there agree that glucose of 106 and LP-IR of 56 is a concern?

Then my new doctor said something that surprised me. “You should consider intermittent fasting,” she exclaimed.

Wait, what? Don’t eat? But…but…but.

She explained to me that there was a lot of research out there that intermittent fasting (IF) was the best way to lower insulin resistance and that many people found it easy to integrate into their diets. She suggested I try IF 4–5 days per week and after a while, we could recheck my insulin numbers. She also jotted down the name of a Canadian doctor who has written a few books about the subject, Dr. Jason Fung, and sent me on my way.

I’ll be honest, I’m a connoisseur of popular diets and eating styles but I’d never heard of IF. So I went home and searched the interwebs for details, and before long I was fully down the rabbit hole. Holy moly there is a whole subculture of people who don’t eat for long periods of time in the name of good health.

I watched a few interviews with Dr. Fung and I was really struck by the science. I downloaded one of his books, The Complete Guide to Fasting: Heal Your Body Through Intermittent, Alternate-Day, and Extended, and read it over the course of a few days. I went from thinking the idea was crazy, to deciding to try it out.

Fasting has been around for thousands of years, and for our ancestor’s fasting was simply a matter of the difficulty of sourcing food. Our paleo brethren often went long periods without eating and I suspect there weren’t too many cavemen with type 2 diabetes. Fasting has long been used in religious worship across multiple belief systems. Hell, when you think about it we all fast daily — we don’t eat while we sleep. Intermittent fasting is just increasing the time you already don’t eat. I decided to use the 16/8 method of fasting, where you don’t eat after dinner and then skip breakfast before breaking the fast at lunch. What that looks like for me is that I don’t eat from 7 p.m. to 11 a.m. (water, tea, and coffee are fine).

Without going into too much scientific detail, IF is about insulin. When you eat, your insulin increases. When you don’t eat, it doesn’t. If your insulin is always elevated because you eat all day, and/or eat too much sugar and carbs, your insulin remains elevated and your body reacts by pumping sugar into your bloodstream. When you are fasting your metabolism increases. The bottom line is your body burns off sugar to provide energy, and when it runs out of sugar it burns stored fat.

There’s a nice explanation of the benefits of IF at Healthline. There’s tons of information all over the web so if you want to learn more just Google it.

I’ve been doing IF for almost three weeks now. Truthfully, it’s not difficult. I just don’t eat after dinner and then skip breakfast. I start eating again around 11 a.m. and between lunch and dinner, I try not to snack too much. Of course, when I do eat I eat a low carb, low added sugar diet. I call it a modified Mediterranean Diet or Pegan (which I’ve written about before).

I won’t know if IF has lowered my insulin levels until I get them checked again in a few months, but I can tell you I have lost weight. Belly weight. My midsection is definitely tighter and my pants are looser. I mean, it’s not rocket science. I’ve been eating less. Is that a crazy idea? I don’t think it is.

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