Climate Change is Going to Give You a Heart Attack

There has been a glut of news lately about the increasing severity of climate change, including this one reported just yesterday about the rise of sea temperatures. I have been thinking a lot about it, and while I have been concerned for decades (at least since I read Earth in the Balance back in the early 90s), this month I went to my first local chapter meeting of Citizens Climate Lobby. While we went around the room and shared our reasons for joining CCL, I was struck by how many of the people in the room mentioned the health ramifications of climate change.

If you think climate change is a hoax or isn’t going to affect you, I can’t help you. Clearly, you are “fact-challenged.” For the rest of us living in the reality-based world, the threats are real and imminent. The current administration, not exactly known for its embrace of science (or reality), published the second half of the Fourth National Climate Assessment 2017/2018 in November and while it is full of dire news, I’d like to focus on just the health aspects of climate change.

“Impacts from climate change on extreme weather and climate-related events, air quality, and the transmission of disease through insects and pests, food, and water increasingly threaten the health and well-being of the American people, particularly populations that are already vulnerable.”

Fourth National Climate Assessment 2017/2018

You can read the entire report online, and here’s a link to the health chapter, but in a nutshell climate change will expose us to extreme heat, poor air quality, reduced food and water quality, changes in infectious agents, and population displacement which in turn will create heat-related illness, cardiopulmonary illness, food/water/vector borne disease, and mental health and stress issues.


Figure 14.1 Climate Change and Health

Much of the cardiovascular health issues associated with climate change revolve around temperature changes. A recently published study from the University of Michigan suggests “climate change may lead to a significant uptick in heart attacks” because of dramatic changes in outdoor temperature. “Global warming is expected to cause extreme weather events, which may, in turn, result in large day-to-day fluctuations in temperature,” said Hedvig Andersson, MD, a cardiology researcher at the University of Michigan and the study’s lead author. 

There are other studies that suggest the same, and I suspect we’ll soon be able to tie actual cardiovascular deaths directly to the effects of climate change. This is of particular interest to me, obviously because of my cardiovascular history, but also because I live in the desert where extreme heat and temperature fluctuations are part of the norm. Maybe I should move to a more temperate location? Oh wait, there may not be any temperate locations as climate change trudges on.

There are other heart-related consequences of climate change as well, such as the fact that increased ozone formation due to higher temperatures harms pulmonary gas exchange and causes stress on the heart and this is associated with heart attacks, increased particulate matter is associated with systematic inflammation, compromised heart function, deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and blood vessel dysfunction, and of course stress and anxiety is associated with heart attacks, sudden cardiac death, and stress-related cardiomyopathy. Extreme cold and extreme heat increase hospital admissions for heart-related disorders and disease, such as dysrhythmias and stroke.

Climate change is the single most important issue facing mankind. It has far-reaching consequences for the planet and civilization. But it occurred to me that we’re just talking about the tip of the iceberg when we talk about sea-level rise, extreme weather events, drought and even infectious disease. Dirty air alone creates havoc for those already struggling with cardiovascular disease, and when you add in stress and mass migration and all the rest, it may not matter if you have to leave your home in South Florida for higher ground because you might not survive the heat and ozone pollution.

I for one am tired of sitting on the sidelines when it comes to climate change. For too long I’ve used the excuse that I wasn’t sure how best to make an impact, and because of that I haven’t made any impact. You can lose your mind researching what we should do about climate change, but I no longer wish to be paralyzed by indecision about how to help. Rather, I’m going to do something — something tangible.

I get a shit ton of eNewsletters and news about climate change. Any given day I may receive a message from The Union of Concerned Scientists, or 350.org, or the Sierra Club. Here’s a great list of organizations fighting climate change. It’s overwhelming, but with the start of the new year, I decided to pick one and do what I can.

I joined Citizens Climate Lobby because it has a singular focus that is easy to get behind and you can make an impact no matter where you live. And while I am not 100 percent sure a carbon fee and dividend law is the best approach to solving this thing, it’s an approach, which is more than most organizations are doing.

There are a lot of ways to get involved with CCL, and at a minimum you can simply stay informed and share news with others. Sometime this month, CCL will reintroduce its bill, the Energy Innovation and Carbon Dividend Act, while it is a long shot to make it to law with the current administration at the helm, we may be able to get enough momentum to make it a priority early in the next administration.

In the meantime, there are other things we can all do. We can fight fracking and other methane emitting causes like factory farming, ride a bike instead of driving all the time, wash clothes in cold water, consume less, personally divest from investments in fossil fuels, and eat more meat-free meals, for example. The point is, everyone can (and should) do something. It’s no longer just your kids and grand kids lives that depend on it — your life depends on it too.

Snoring is Much More Than a Simple Nuisance

I ran across an article today with the hyperbolic headline “7 Warning Signs That You May Be at Risk of a Heart Attack.” I truly hate headlines like this because they almost always lead to nonscientific blather. This article, from Men’s Health, suggests you may want to be concerned if you are exhausted (who isn’t), have erectile dysfunction (if your blood vessels down there are damaged, there’s a good chance the ones near your heart could be damaged as well), you have leg or hip cramps (again, blood flow issues), you’re bloated (too many beers?), and a few other seemingly innocuous maladies. But one potential symptom caught my attention and should catch your attention too — snoring.

Look at this sexy guy sleeping sound with his CPAP machine!

Snoring may seem harmless, but it could mean you have sleep apnea and that could be a big problem. Sleep apnea is a sleep disorder in which breathing repeatedly stops and starts and that can have major consequences for your heart health. In fact, obstructive sleep apnea increases the risk of heart failure by 140%, the risk of stroke by 60%, and the risk of coronary heart disease by 30%.

Let’s be honest, most of us snore once in a while or even all the time. The person who shares your bed has likely let you know you’re making noise with a late-night nudge or perhaps an occasional punch in the nose if it gets bad (kidding). You probably know if you snore, especially if you’ve ever woken yourself up from it. But you probably don’t know if you have sleep apnea unless you’ve been tested for it. A sleep apnea evaluation usually involves overnight monitoring at a sleep center although these days there are even some at-home sleep tests.

A few years prior to my heart attack my wife finally insisted I talk to my doctor about my snoring. Like a lot of people, I associated snoring with obesity and figured mine was just a minor case. But it had become so prevalent that oftentimes I’d wake up in the morning to find my wife sleeping on the sofa because I was keeping her up. I agreed to see my doctor about it, for her sake, but had I been paying more attention to the research I might have taken it a lot more seriously a lot earlier on.

There is a clear connection between sleep apnea and heart disease. Here’s a quote from an article on the American Heart Association’s website:

“The evidence is very strong for the relationship between sleep apnea and hypertension and cardiovascular disease generally, so people really need to know that.”

— Donna Arnett, Ph.D., chair and professor of epidemiology at the School of Public Health at the University of Alabama at Birmingham

A Google search for “sleep apnea and heart disease” brings up tons of articles and links to studies that show a clear connection. Unfortunately for me, while I discovered my sleep apnea before I had a heart attack I didn’t know it was a potential symptom of heart disease and therefore it didn’t raise any suspicions that would have caused me to get my heart checked out in time.

When I had my sleep study it turned out I had an apnea event (literally stopped breathing) about 80 times per hour. Think about that for a minute. That is more than once per minute. Of course that is going to cause strain on the heart!

Here’s some information on sleep apnea event occurrences. Normal is fewer than 5 breathing events per hour of sleep. Mild sleep apnea: 5 to 14.9 breathing events per hour of sleep. Moderate sleep apnea: 15 to 29.9 breathing events per hour of sleep. Severe sleep apnea: 30 or more breathing events per hour of sleep.

I was diagnosed with severe sleep apnea and nobody told me it could be associated with heart disease so I didn’t immediately go get checked out by a cardiologist. That seems like malpractice, but if I’ve learned anything over the past decade it’s that we have to be our own health advocates because doctors are overworked and under-educated in terms of knowing the latest science.

I ended up with a C-PAP machine, which applies mild air pressure on a continuous basis to keep the airways continuously open while I sleep. I have adapted well to it and use it religiously, every night. I hate having to use it, but using it means I no longer stop breathing 80 times an hour. I get a better night’s sleep and frankly, I feel safer using it. It’s a pain to travel with, but someday I’ll spring for a travel-sized machine as well.

So yes, snoring can be a symptom of heart disease or an impending heart attack. Now that you know this, you have no excuse for not talking to your doctor about your snoring. Trust me, it just might save your life.

Why I’m Doubling Down on Low Carb, Intermittent Fasting in 2019

I’m not much of a New Years resolution guy, but it’s hard not to think about the year ahead as the new year approaches. When it comes to my diet plans for 2019, I feel the need to echo the late George Herbert Walker Bush during the 1988 presidential campaign — stay the course.

All of my reading and research last year led to my full adoption of a low carbohydrate lifestyle, and nothing has changed that would lead me to rethink this approach. I’m not a doctor, but I’m fully confident that my cardiovascular health improved over the course of 2018. A year-end visit to my cardiologist confirmed my own analysis. In December I had an echocardiogram, a nuclear stress test, and a blood workup and all of these diagnostics returned very positive results.

The biggest danger for a heart attack survivor like me is to have a second cardiovascular event. In the first few years following my near fatal event, my heart performance was stable and improved a bit. My blood work was better, if not perfect, and all the other tests showed incremental improvement. Most importantly, my ejection fraction (my heart’s ability to pump blood out to my body) went up each year.

At the time of my heart attack, my ejection fraction (EF) was measured at around 30-35 percent. An EF of less than 40 percent may be evidence of heart failure or cardiomyopathy. For me, this was the scariest aspect of my event. It was also what has been driving me to make changes to my lifestyle.

Improving my EF has provided positive reinforcement for the things I’ve been doing to improve my cardiovascular health. I know that lifestyle led to my heart attack, and therefore lifestyle could keep me from having another one. This is why I’ve spent the past seven years exercising more, taking my prescribed medications, seeing my cardiologist regularly, and eating right.

Honestly, the only aspect of the above lifestyle changes that have provided any complications for me over the years since my heart attack has been eating right. I truly believe the medical establishment either doesn’t know or doesn’t want to suggest how to eat appropriately for cardiovascular health (I think they don’t want to provide advice because it is not so clear cut and if they are wrong they may be worried about liability). All the proof you need that the medical establishment doesn’t know the best way to eat is to Google diet advice — you’ll go down a rabbit hole from which you may never surface.

After my heart attack, my first cardiologist told me to avoid sodium because high blood pressure can lead to heart failure and/or cardiomyopathy. In that first year I avoided sodium like it was poison. Do you have any idea how hard it is to limit sodium intake to less than 1,500 mg a day?

But sodium didn’t cause my heart attack, so I spent a lot of time researching the latest medical advice on diet. I was really frustrated with what I found. I read about the China Study and Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn and thought perhaps meat was the cause of heart disease. I became a pescatarian, eliminating all meat except for fish. Then research started to point to the Mediterranean Diet as the best overall diet and that seemed reasonable so I went down that path. My blood work was better, but still not where I needed it to be.

I watched every movie about diet from Forks Over Knives to Fed Up to Fat, Sick and Nearly Dead and all I got was more frustrated and confused. But as time went on, I started to notice a trend — there was more and more information out there about the dangers of carbs and sugar. I really honed in on this trend, reading everything I could get my hands on. At the same time, I started working with a new primary care doctor who also believed that carbs and sugar were the real culprits of diseases like diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and heart disease.

I jumped in to the low carb movement under doctor care and with regular blood work checkups to assess how I was doing. And for me, the results have been compelling. My blood work is enviable by any standard, and my weight is in a good range. Best of all, my EF has continued to rise and last month was measured at between 60-65 percent — the best it has been since before my heart attack and within the normal range.

As of today, I have above average blood work and a normal EF. That’s all I could have asked for seven years post heart attack. I may cheat here and there (I do enjoy a beer now and again), and my sugars are not as low as I’d like them (that’s where the intermittent fasting is hopefully going to help), but basically, I am in great cardiovascular health. And I’m enjoying how I eat, which is to say I get to eat a wide range of foods including meat, eggs, and a little whole grain bread.

So here I am in January 2019 with probably the best cardiovascular health I’ve had since I was a teen. I attribute this to exercising more, taking my prescribed medications, seeing my cardiologist regularly, and eating right — that is to say, a low carb, low added sugar diet. I definitely need to exercise a bit more, but for the first time in a long time, I am confident I am eating healthy.