Why I’m Doubling Down on Low Carb, Intermittent Fasting in 2019

I’m not much of a New Years resolution guy, but it’s hard not to think about the year ahead as the new year approaches. When it comes to my diet plans for 2019, I feel the need to echo the late George Herbert Walker Bush during the 1988 presidential campaign — stay the course.

All of my reading and research last year led to my full adoption of a low carbohydrate lifestyle, and nothing has changed that would lead me to rethink this approach. I’m not a doctor, but I’m fully confident that my cardiovascular health improved over the course of 2018. A year-end visit to my cardiologist confirmed my own analysis. In December I had an echocardiogram, a nuclear stress test, and a blood workup and all of these diagnostics returned very positive results.

The biggest danger for a heart attack survivor like me is to have a second cardiovascular event. In the first few years following my near fatal event, my heart performance was stable and improved a bit. My blood work was better, if not perfect, and all the other tests showed incremental improvement. Most importantly, my ejection fraction (my heart’s ability to pump blood out to my body) went up each year.

At the time of my heart attack, my ejection fraction (EF) was measured at around 30-35 percent. An EF of less than 40 percent may be evidence of heart failure or cardiomyopathy. For me, this was the scariest aspect of my event. It was also what has been driving me to make changes to my lifestyle.

Improving my EF has provided positive reinforcement for the things I’ve been doing to improve my cardiovascular health. I know that lifestyle led to my heart attack, and therefore lifestyle could keep me from having another one. This is why I’ve spent the past seven years exercising more, taking my prescribed medications, seeing my cardiologist regularly, and eating right.

Honestly, the only aspect of the above lifestyle changes that have provided any complications for me over the years since my heart attack has been eating right. I truly believe the medical establishment either doesn’t know or doesn’t want to suggest how to eat appropriately for cardiovascular health (I think they don’t want to provide advice because it is not so clear cut and if they are wrong they may be worried about liability). All the proof you need that the medical establishment doesn’t know the best way to eat is to Google diet advice — you’ll go down a rabbit hole from which you may never surface.

After my heart attack, my first cardiologist told me to avoid sodium because high blood pressure can lead to heart failure and/or cardiomyopathy. In that first year I avoided sodium like it was poison. Do you have any idea how hard it is to limit sodium intake to less than 1,500 mg a day?

But sodium didn’t cause my heart attack, so I spent a lot of time researching the latest medical advice on diet. I was really frustrated with what I found. I read about the China Study and Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn and thought perhaps meat was the cause of heart disease. I became a pescatarian, eliminating all meat except for fish. Then research started to point to the Mediterranean Diet as the best overall diet and that seemed reasonable so I went down that path. My blood work was better, but still not where I needed it to be.

I watched every movie about diet from Forks Over Knives to Fed Up to Fat, Sick and Nearly Dead and all I got was more frustrated and confused. But as time went on, I started to notice a trend — there was more and more information out there about the dangers of carbs and sugar. I really honed in on this trend, reading everything I could get my hands on. At the same time, I started working with a new primary care doctor who also believed that carbs and sugar were the real culprits of diseases like diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and heart disease.

I jumped in to the low carb movement under doctor care and with regular blood work checkups to assess how I was doing. And for me, the results have been compelling. My blood work is enviable by any standard, and my weight is in a good range. Best of all, my EF has continued to rise and last month was measured at between 60-65 percent — the best it has been since before my heart attack and within the normal range.

As of today, I have above average blood work and a normal EF. That’s all I could have asked for seven years post heart attack. I may cheat here and there (I do enjoy a beer now and again), and my sugars are not as low as I’d like them (that’s where the intermittent fasting is hopefully going to help), but basically, I am in great cardiovascular health. And I’m enjoying how I eat, which is to say I get to eat a wide range of foods including meat, eggs, and a little whole grain bread.

So here I am in January 2019 with probably the best cardiovascular health I’ve had since I was a teen. I attribute this to exercising more, taking my prescribed medications, seeing my cardiologist regularly, and eating right — that is to say, a low carb, low added sugar diet. I definitely need to exercise a bit more, but for the first time in a long time, I am confident I am eating healthy.

2 thoughts on “Why I’m Doubling Down on Low Carb, Intermittent Fasting in 2019

  1. Dennis Timberlake January 3, 2019 / 10:42 am

    Hi Len,

    I’m happy to see you posting more often as I enjoy reading your insights. That said, I don’t share your enthusiasm for a low carb approach.

    First, in full disclosure, I haven’t tried such a diet so, unlike you, I’m not speaking from firsthand experience. I also want to say that I’m thrilled that this approach appears to be working for you. Having gone down a bit of the rabbit hole you referenced, it is clear that a sustainable diet is an individualistic endeavor.

    I believe that most diets agree that it is wise to limit sugars and simple carbohydrates. Where I diverge from your thoughts, however, is in saying that all carbs are to be avoided. I believe the preaching of low carbs is the same fallacy as saying that all fats are to be avoided.

    A diet high in complex carbs, i.e., most vegetables, with minimal animal protein/fats seems to be a reasonable path. That’s where I’m at anyways.

    I fully understand the frustration in finding a diet to follow in which one can have confidence. Thank you for sharing your journey.

    Dennis

    Liked by 1 person

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