Climate Change is Going to Give You a Heart Attack

There has been a glut of news lately about the increasing severity of climate change, including this one reported just yesterday about the rise of sea temperatures. I have been thinking a lot about it, and while I have been concerned for decades (at least since I read Earth in the Balance back in the early 90s), this month I went to my first local chapter meeting of Citizens Climate Lobby. While we went around the room and shared our reasons for joining CCL, I was struck by how many of the people in the room mentioned the health ramifications of climate change.

If you think climate change is a hoax or isn’t going to affect you, I can’t help you. Clearly, you are “fact-challenged.” For the rest of us living in the reality-based world, the threats are real and imminent. The current administration, not exactly known for its embrace of science (or reality), published the second half of the Fourth National Climate Assessment 2017/2018 in November and while it is full of dire news, I’d like to focus on just the health aspects of climate change.

“Impacts from climate change on extreme weather and climate-related events, air quality, and the transmission of disease through insects and pests, food, and water increasingly threaten the health and well-being of the American people, particularly populations that are already vulnerable.”

Fourth National Climate Assessment 2017/2018

You can read the entire report online, and here’s a link to the health chapter, but in a nutshell climate change will expose us to extreme heat, poor air quality, reduced food and water quality, changes in infectious agents, and population displacement which in turn will create heat-related illness, cardiopulmonary illness, food/water/vector borne disease, and mental health and stress issues.


Figure 14.1 Climate Change and Health

Much of the cardiovascular health issues associated with climate change revolve around temperature changes. A recently published study from the University of Michigan suggests “climate change may lead to a significant uptick in heart attacks” because of dramatic changes in outdoor temperature. “Global warming is expected to cause extreme weather events, which may, in turn, result in large day-to-day fluctuations in temperature,” said Hedvig Andersson, MD, a cardiology researcher at the University of Michigan and the study’s lead author. 

There are other studies that suggest the same, and I suspect we’ll soon be able to tie actual cardiovascular deaths directly to the effects of climate change. This is of particular interest to me, obviously because of my cardiovascular history, but also because I live in the desert where extreme heat and temperature fluctuations are part of the norm. Maybe I should move to a more temperate location? Oh wait, there may not be any temperate locations as climate change trudges on.

There are other heart-related consequences of climate change as well, such as the fact that increased ozone formation due to higher temperatures harms pulmonary gas exchange and causes stress on the heart and this is associated with heart attacks, increased particulate matter is associated with systematic inflammation, compromised heart function, deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and blood vessel dysfunction, and of course stress and anxiety is associated with heart attacks, sudden cardiac death, and stress-related cardiomyopathy. Extreme cold and extreme heat increase hospital admissions for heart-related disorders and disease, such as dysrhythmias and stroke.

Climate change is the single most important issue facing mankind. It has far-reaching consequences for the planet and civilization. But it occurred to me that we’re just talking about the tip of the iceberg when we talk about sea-level rise, extreme weather events, drought and even infectious disease. Dirty air alone creates havoc for those already struggling with cardiovascular disease, and when you add in stress and mass migration and all the rest, it may not matter if you have to leave your home in South Florida for higher ground because you might not survive the heat and ozone pollution.

I for one am tired of sitting on the sidelines when it comes to climate change. For too long I’ve used the excuse that I wasn’t sure how best to make an impact, and because of that I haven’t made any impact. You can lose your mind researching what we should do about climate change, but I no longer wish to be paralyzed by indecision about how to help. Rather, I’m going to do something — something tangible.

I get a shit ton of eNewsletters and news about climate change. Any given day I may receive a message from The Union of Concerned Scientists, or 350.org, or the Sierra Club. Here’s a great list of organizations fighting climate change. It’s overwhelming, but with the start of the new year, I decided to pick one and do what I can.

I joined Citizens Climate Lobby because it has a singular focus that is easy to get behind and you can make an impact no matter where you live. And while I am not 100 percent sure a carbon fee and dividend law is the best approach to solving this thing, it’s an approach, which is more than most organizations are doing.

There are a lot of ways to get involved with CCL, and at a minimum you can simply stay informed and share news with others. Sometime this month, CCL will reintroduce its bill, the Energy Innovation and Carbon Dividend Act, while it is a long shot to make it to law with the current administration at the helm, we may be able to get enough momentum to make it a priority early in the next administration.

In the meantime, there are other things we can all do. We can fight fracking and other methane emitting causes like factory farming, ride a bike instead of driving all the time, wash clothes in cold water, consume less, personally divest from investments in fossil fuels, and eat more meat-free meals, for example. The point is, everyone can (and should) do something. It’s no longer just your kids and grand kids lives that depend on it — your life depends on it too.

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