Intermittent Fasting Off to Metabolic Slow Start

Three months ago, in an effort to reduce my fasting glucose levels and hemoglobin A1c which are slightly elevated, I added 16/8 intermittent fasting (IF) into my diet routine. The idea was that by not eating during a 16-hour window each day, I’d lower my insulin resistance and bring my sugars into a more normal range.

It’s worth noting that my sugars were not too high (109), but rather near the top of the normal range (less than 100) butting up against the pre-diabetic range (100 to 125). My A1c was 5.2, within the normal range, but not too far away from the prediabetic range of 5.7 or above. With my cholesterol and triglycerides in wonderful shape thanks to my low carb high-fat diet, the sugars were the only thing threatening my overall cardiovascular health.

Yesterday I got my most recent blood test results, and while my cholesterol/triglyceride levels were flat, my friggin’ fasting glucose and A1c went up to 112 and 5.6 respectively. Needless to say, this was not the result I was looking for when I started IF in early September. In fact, while my doctor suggested I do IF five times per week I have been doing it virtually every day for three months.

Rather than panic and give up, I thought a little more about how I’ve been eating (and drinking) over the past three months and the truth is while I have generally been on a low carb high-fat diet, I have cheated a ton. It started with a 12-day vacation to London and Paris, where I ate more than my share of chocolate croissants, macarons, and muffins and drank more than my share of beer. When we got back from Europe, I continued to snack here and there on sugary cookies and muffins and continued to have a few beers every week. I went on a boys’ trip to Wyoming where in two days I drank more than I do in a typical month, went to a beer festival with my son, and then between Thanksgiving and Christmas I’ve sneaked an unhealthy amount of sugar-laden foods and drank plenty of beer. I also hurt my lower back, which still hurts by the way, and as a result, I have not exercised much at all.

Mmmm Beer.

All this is to say, I probably counteracted the good from the IF with the bad from my lack of dietary willpower. I sent my primary care doc a note to ask for her advice, and she said to continue with IF because it really takes closer to a year to see significant results on the A1c and sugar front. She suggested I try doing IF only five days per week, but to try to extend it a couple of days a week from 16 hours off to 18-20. On the diet front she told me to eat a diet that I will stick with.

Rather than freak out, I have decided to rededicate myself to eating a low carb high fat diet, get serious about cutting out the “holiday” snacking, do IF Monday through Friday, and increase my walking to 5-6 days per week or a minimum of 150 minutes per week as recommended by the American Heart Association and others. Honestly, I felt better physically when I was sticking to the low carb high-fat diet more religiously. And the more beer I drink, the worse my GI system feels. If I didn’t love beer so much I’d give it up completely, but for now, I suppose I’ll limit my intake of the nectar of the gods and only imbibe on special occasions.

The experiment continues!